Frequently Asked Questions

FamilyTable of Contents

How do I know if someone has a problem?

Where can I find the right level of treatment?

What can I do to help someone I care about?

What is an Intervention?

What about drug testing?

When is the best time to get someone into treatment?

 

How do I know if someone has a problem?

With Alcohol

  1. Do you lose time from work due to drinking?
  2. Is drinking making your home life unhappy?
  3. Do you drink because you are shy with other people?
  4. Is drinking affecting your reputation?
  5. Have you ever felt remorse after drinking?
  6. Have you had financial difficulties as a result of drinking?
  7. Do you turn to inferior companions and environments when drinking?AA BB
  8. Does your drinking make you careless of your family’s welfare?
  9. Has your ambition decreased since drinking?
  10. Do you crave a drink at a definite time daily?
  11. Do you want a drink the next morning?
  12. Does drinking cause you to have difficulty in sleeping?
  13. Has your efficiency decreased since drinking?
  14. Is drinking jeopardizing your job or business?
  15. Do you drink to escape from worries or trouble?
  16. Do you drink alone?
  17. Have you ever had a loss of memory as a result of drinking?
  18. Has your physician ever treated you for drinking?
  19. Do you drink to build up your self-confidence?
  20. Have you ever been to a hospital or an institution on account of drinking?
  21. Have you ever had legal problems related to drinking?

 

If you have answered YES to any ONE of these questions there is a DEFINITE WARNING that you may be alcoholic.

 

If you have answered YES to any TWO questions the CHANCES ARE that you are alcoholic.

 

If you have answered YES to any THREE or more questions you are DEFINITELY ALCOHOLIC and you should get help immediately.

 

Do you have a Drug / Cocaine problem?

  1. Do you ever use drugs alone?
  2. Have you ever switched drugs, thinking one was the problem?
  3. Have you ever lied to a doctor to obtain prescription drugs?
  4. Have you stolen drugs or stolen to buy drugs?
  5. Have you ever used one drug to relieve the effects of another drug?
  6. Do you avoid people who would disapprove of your drug use?
  7. Have you ever used a drug without knowing what it was?
  8. Has your job or school performance suffered from your drug use?
  9. Have you ever been arrested as a result of using drugs?
  10. Have you ever lied about what or how much you use?
  11. Does the purchase of drugs affect your financial stability?
  12. Have you ever tried to stop or control your drug use
  13. Have you ever been in a jail, hospital, or treatment center due to using?
  14. Does drug use interfere with your sleeping or eating?
  15. Does the thought of running out of drugs terrify you?
  16. Does it seem impossible to live without drugs?
  17. Is your drug use disrupting your family life or relationships?
  18. Do drugs seem necessary to have a good time and fit in?
  19. Have you ever felt guilty or ashamed about your using?
  20. Do you think a lot about drugs?
  21. Have you ever used drugs to mask your emotional pain?
  22.  Have you ever overdosed on any drugs?
  23. Do you continue to use drugs despite negative consequences?
  24. Do you feel that you may have a drug problem?

If you are a drug addict or have a chemical dependency or substance abuse problem, you must first admit the problem before any progress can be made toward recovery. These questions, may help to show you how using drugs has made your life unmanageable. Drug addiction is a disease which, without recovery, ends in jails, mental institutions, and even death.”
http://www.friendofbills.com/drug-abuse-…
I was told that if you wonder about having a problem, usually people who wonder if they have drug problem – this is your best indicator of problem.

Now, has the family been affected?

 

  1. Do you really believe the drugs you found in your loved one’s room “belongs to a friend”?
  2. Why do you have to search your loved one’s room anyway?
  3. Do you really believe that was the first time?
  4. How did you feel the first time you had to lie for your spouse or your child?
  5. Can you remember when using or drinking was only a weekend thing?
  6. Why have drugs become more important than the family?
  7. Were drugs a part of the lifestyle you’ve always dreamed of?
  8. Aren’t you tired of bailing your loved one out? Wouldn’t you rather spend your money?
  9. Tired of looking out the window, wondering where they are, who they’re with, or what they’re doing?
  10. If everything you’ve tried hasn’t worked, don’t you think it’s time to seek help?

 

If you can answer any of these questions relating to your loved ones on drugs or alcohol, you may need help.

 

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Where can I find the right level of treatment?

 

If you or a loved on needs to be assessed for outpatient counseling or inpatient (hospitalization) we can help in determining the appropriate level of help necessary to address your situation. The Right Step – San Antonio will discuss your situation with you and if you would prefer a clinical evaluation, one can be administered.

 

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What can I do to help someone I care about?

 

A few things:

 

First, realize that the person using chemicals has a disease. They will be dishonest to themselves and others. They will be experiencing problems in their lives financially, legally, socially, at home, work, school or in relationships. The thing to remember is you will feel anger at them, but it probably won’t help.

 

Second, don’t try to treat your own family or friends. Even as counselors, we realize we can lose our objectivity and best judgment when trying to counsel those we love. Please seek professional help.

 

Third, be part of their recovery. The chance of staying in recovery increases dramatically. Many loved ones think, “It’s not my problem, it’s his (or hers).” The problem is, families and friends are affected. Go to meetings (Al-Anon, Codependents Anonymous). Seek professional counseling at church, with professional counselors. Call anonymously if you must, but find solutions.

 

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What is an Intervention?

There are two ways to intervene with a substance abuser: an informal intervention (a personal discussion) or a structured intervention. The latter involves bringing together a group of people with the substance abuser to explore how the abuse has affected all their lives, and is used when the person has repeatedly declined to get help.

In any intervention, it’s important to approach your loved one when he/she is not high or drunk (and when you are not acutely upset.)

A structured intervention should be facilitated by a professional. The goal is to have the person begin treatment immediately. (After 3 days the addict / alcoholic thinks because life is good; they don’t need help anymore.)

 

 

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What about drug testing?

The Right Step – San Antonio uses local approved labs. The labs are 95% accurate and result can be attained within 2 days. Clients will be tested for Marijuana, Cocaine, Heroin, Amphetamines and 6 other chemicals. Clients will also be tested for Alcohol. If tests are required for legal situations, collections can be processed as “Chain of custody” to ensure validity in legal proceedings.

 

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When is the best time to get someone into treatment?

When someone needs help it is best to have an option available immediately. We have found that after 3 days, most clients lose the desire to get help. If they cancel their first appointment they have a 50% chance of not returning for the second appointment. If they cancel their second appointment the chances of starting treatment is 85%. Usually when someone has had a consequence occur in their life, be it legal, occupational or any other serious event, call at once. We are on call and can assess and determine the best course of action for your recovery needs.

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